Archive for April 2014 | Monthly archive page

Artist Potter

Alongside his great devotion to clay, Steve Briggs is motivated by his desire to be not locked in by any situation, position, or even what he writes down when asked his profession. Ceramist is cold, Artist is pretentious, Potter is appealingly grit-ty but not enough of the rest for him, so he has finally landed on Artist-Potter as an acceptable amount of each.

He has been a poet, an English teacher, and a filmmaker, always with his potter wife working on the wheel in his basement, until one day he walked into Betty Woodmans Boulder, Colorado studio and announced he wanted to make pots. Generous as always, she sent him to study at Boulder’s Firehouse Pottery Program which she had started. → Read more

Dancing Forms

Nancy has two great loves in her life—making jewelry and dancing traditional Swedish folk dances. The jewelry she creates, which is very sculptural and concerned with negative space, has the same sense of motion that her Swedish folk dancing does—a rounded, rolling movement. The forms created in the dances are as elegant as her jewelry and the awareness of the spaces in between is surely why the dancers don’t step on each other. She was the most surprised when she realized she was incorporating the same flowing motion into her work as in her dancing! She has always drawn and moved in squiggly curly shapes but form, not ornamentation is her trademark. → Read more

Hands with Gemstone Soul

Marguerite Specht’s hands are both gentle and strong. They are hands that have bathed many babies, cooked many meals, and strung many gemstone necklaces. Marguerite describes her hands as soul-imbued, revealing, and wise and says that they both stimulate her by showing her things and save her by calming her down. She touches everything, be it a swatch of linen, a basil leaf or a cut amethyst as though she is feeling it for the first time, exploring it for its truth. → Read more

September 2012 – Annie Gifford, painter and Boulder Arts & Crafts Gallery member since 1980, started her painting career at age 4. She remembers her father was a huge encouragement to her from the beginning. He even brokered her first sale, a painting of a clown. The price was $12. → Read more

For the young Dilia Salvador it was marbles. She was the only girl playing, but she was good and routinely beat all the boys, until her collection of marbles filled two bags. In one bag was her workhorse competition gear, in the other the special marbles she treasured too much to lose.

Later it was river rocks, then petro glyphs, then beaded scarves, and at present she is fascinated in clay totems like stacked beads. Dilia finds inspiration for her jewelry in nature, in folk art, in other cultures, and loves working in many mediums. → Read more